Keeping Business Executives Safe When Traveling Overseas

About 48 percent of all business executives who make more than 13 trips a year say that their primary concern when traveling is staying safe. Business travelers should take precautions to stay healthy while traveling along with using caution to protect themselves from dangerous situations. It is essential that travelers know what to do in various scenarios. Businesses should create a written plan covering the most common scenarios along with what they expect their employees to do in each case when traveling overseas.

Staying Healthy When Traveling Overseas

Travelers can take several precautions to help them stay healthy when traveling overseas. All employees should be washing their hands on a regular basis. Encourage your employees to drink bottled water. When setting up travel itineraries, read reviews of restaurants as choosing top-rated restaurants often helps one avoid food contamination. Within reason, allow employees to use part of their travel budgets to stay active or house employees in hotels with good fitness facilities. A company’s travel budget should pay for recommended vaccinations wherever they choose to send your employees. Employees should have access to the latest travel health warnings from a reputable organization before leaving.

Employees should have a list of the best hospitals and emergency clinics in the area in a folder when they travel. The name of these facilities should be written down in the local language helping employees share the information with taxi drivers and chauffeurs if needed. Furthermore, it is a great idea to write down any health conditions in the local language. Teach employees that they can contact the local embassy for more help. Many companies pay for travelers’ insurance on their key employees or offer it at a greatly reduced rate.

Staying Safe Physically When Traveling for Business

Staying safe on the road begins with booking the right hotel. After checking a hotel’s reputation, then book a room between the third and sixth floors for your employee. Rooms located on the first floor are more prone to being broken into while those above the sixth floor are harder for emergency responders to reach. Teach employees that if their room number is announced when they check-in that they should immediately ask for another room. In addition, encourage travelers to carry their own hotel safety devices with them.

Someone at the company’s headquarters should have immediate access to any employee’s travel itinerary. Employees should be taught who they can contact 24 hours a day seven days a week to receive help if they feel like they are in trouble. A file should be created with copies of the traveler’s passport and tickets. The employee should give this to someone at the office before embarking on their travels; they should also give it to a trusted family member or friend along with emailing a copy of it to themselves.

After they leave, employees should be encouraged to carry all their important travel documents, credit cards and cash in different locations. The safest spot to carry these important items is in front pockets as it is much harder to pick a front pocket than a back. Employees may be tempted to turn their back for just a second if the documents and money are in a pocketbook.

Staying safe while traveling on corporate business begins with staying healthy. Take precautions before leaving by getting the right vaccinations and reading about the area. Drinking bottled water and hand washing can help prevent many illnesses. Encourage employees to make copies of their travel documents and to carry all important papers and money in separate locations. Ask employees to choose hotels based on their safety ratings.